GALLERY CLOSED ANZAC DAY | THURSDAY 25th APRIL

Milminyina Dhamarrandji

Solo Exhibition07 Dec - 20 Dec 2023

Milminyina Dhamarrandji
'Solo Exhibition'

Milminyina Dhamarrandji  |  2023 Solo Exhibition

Opening night 7th December   |   Exhibition ends 20th December

Milminyina Dhamarrandji currently works at the renowned Buku Larrŋgay Mulka in Yirrkala, located northeast of the Top End. Milminyina was taught to paint and weave by her mother Rrirraliny Yunupingu, having grown up watching her work. With this rich foundation for painting and weaving from her mother, Milminyina delved into bark painting and larrakity (hollow log coffins) at Buku Art Centre. .M Contemporary is pleased to present these bark paintings and larrakity as part of Milminyina’s solo exhibition later this year. We are pleased to announce that the artist will be visiting the gallery for the first time for the exhibition and presenting an artist talk December 7 at 6pm.

Exhibition Dates

  • December7
  • Opening Night, 5 - 7pm
  • December7
  • Artist Talk, 6pm
  • December20
  • Exhibition Ends
Milminyina Dhamarrandji | 2023 Solo Exhibition

Milminyina was born in 1960 at the very northeastern tip of the Northern Territory. She has a very distinguished lineage. She is the daughter of Gumatj woman Rrirraliny Yunupiŋu (a daughter of famous artist and political figure Mungurrawuy Yunupiŋu), and Gunguyuma Dhamarrandji, who was brought up by the legendary Djapu leader Woŋgu Munuŋgurr.

She had sold paintings on canvas for years but recently expanded her presence and status working on bark paintings and Larrakitj (memorial poles) at Buku-Larrŋgay Mulka. It was in this context that she began to explore the theme of the songlines associated with ceremonies connected to Dhambaḏiny (Death or Deaf Adder) on Bremer Island.

This exhibition brings to life the connection between the people, the art and the spirit which is in the land. It also shows the significance that art plays in maintaining and strengthening ephemeral culture. This becomes a virtuous circle when you appreciate that the art is made entirely from the land apart from the binding material.

“When you look at art, every line and the design on it means something to you. It’s from your heritage, your Yolŋu backbone, and it’s your identity as well. It is also connected to the songline and the land.”

– Milminyina Dhammarrandji

Milminyina Dhamarrandji

Milminyina was born in 1960 at Wirrwawuy, near Yirrkala and Nhulunbuy on the Gove Peninsula, at the very northeastern tip of the Northern Territory. She is the daughter of Gumatj woman Rrirraliny Yunupiŋu (a daughter of famous arist and political figure Mungurrawuy Yunupiŋu), and Gunguyuma Dhamarrandji, who was brought up by the legendary Djapu leader Woŋgu Munuŋgurr. Her märi, or mother’s mother’s clan, is Rirratjiŋu, the landowners of Yirrkala, who share many sacred designs with the Djambarrpuyŋu of this area. The Djambarrpuyŋu clan which she belongs to are mainly based in the Westerly end of the Yolŋu nation near a major sacred site at Buckingham Bay. This arm of the clan use the surname Guyula. A small cluster of the clan is based around a group of sacred sites at Yirrkala. These people are known by the surname Dhammarrandji. In the ancestral everywhen the spirit people of this place and the offshore islands in the form of terns conducted ceremony around the Merri or sacred string which was cut. The short string was given to the Rirratjiŋu and the longer to the Djambarrpuyŋu. Hence the Rirratjiŋu are sedentary here and the Djambarrpuyŋu range far to the West.

Milminyina Dhamarrandji | Solo Exhibition

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