Luke Thurgate

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Luke Thurgate is an artist and educator based in Adelaide. He completed a Bachelor of Fine Arts at the University of Newcastle and has an extensive exhibition history including recent exhibitions at Burra Regional Art Gallery, National Art School and Adelaide Central Gallery. He was a finalist in the Dobell Drawing Prize 2019 and currently lectures in the Drawing Department at Adelaide Central School of Art.

Luke’s multi-disciplinary studio practice explores the construction and deconstruction of ‘self’ in relation to masculinity, sexuality, romance and fear. His work is often figurative and narrative, borrowing from a range of sources, including popular culture, pornography, and queer history. His recent work manipulates the codification used by (or imposed on) individuals to connect and/or separate themselves from others. He uses the 1950’s urban myth of Newcastle’s ‘Yellow Socks Gang’ as a framework to discuss the tension between menace and sympathy in relation to signifiers of queer identity. The cultural residue of the ‘Yellow Socks’ story and its ensuing fiction, acts as an analogue for contemporary uncertainties about otherness.

Luke Thurgate is an artist and educator based in Adelaide. He completed a Bachelor of Fine Arts at the University of Newcastle and has an extensive exhibition history including recent exhibitions at Burra Regional Art Gallery, National Art School and Adelaide Central Gallery. He was a finalist in the Dobell Drawing Prize 2019 and currently lectures in the Drawing Department at Adelaide Central School of Art.

Luke’s multi-disciplinary studio practice explores the construction and deconstruction of ‘self’ in relation to masculinity, sexuality, romance and fear. His work is often figurative and narrative, borrowing from a range of sources, including popular culture, pornography, and queer history. His recent work manipulates the codification used by (or imposed on) individuals to connect and/or separate themselves from others. He uses the 1950’s urban myth of Newcastle’s ‘Yellow Socks Gang’ as a framework to discuss the tension between menace and sympathy in relation to signifiers of queer identity. The cultural residue of the ‘Yellow Socks’ story and its ensuing fiction, acts as an analogue for contemporary uncertainties about otherness.

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